© 2022 Resilient River Communities

Resilient River Communities

River Managers' Professional Development Programme

This programme has been designed to identify a framework to raise awareness, learning and development pathways and ultimately drive recruitment and attraction strategies to assure river management expertise for the future

Upcoming Workshops

Successful completion of a workshop will result in participants being awarded a Attendance Certificate stating CPD hours. 

Council Monthly Catch ups:

Let's connect, share an idea, talk about issues and work on solutions as a team. 

Followed by networking. 

Presenter, Brooke Clark, Catchment Group Planner, Environmental Implementation, Otago Regional Council

Brooke would love to have a conversation about how asset management plans and design lines are being communicated to the community in a way that is digestible by the public. Especially when working with community/catchment group and riparian management.

To join email rachael.armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

A half-day workshop providing explanation and examples of the concepts described in the recently released NZ River Managers SIG – Room for the River guidelines. The technical basis for the Room for the River concept will be explained along with examples of the methodology that can be used to determine river management lines and agreed intervention protocols to facilitate effective implementation. 

Where

Christchurch

When

Wednesday 3 July 2024

Time

1.00pm-5:00pm

Cost

$400 + GST

$400 + GST (council staff rate)

How to register

To register email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

  • What is Room for the River
  • How can it be used to manage flood and erosion risks within the context of climate change and Te mana o te wai
  • How to determine river management design lines
  • Interventions and dealing with critical assets within the river management design lines
  • Implementation enablers including planning controls

Outcomes

A better understanding of how to derive river management design lines and how they can be implemented to achieve Room for the River outcomes.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

Presenter

Kyle Christensen - River Engineering Consultant

Date: Friday 12 July 2024

Location: 100 Cuba Street, Wellington

Time: 10am-3pm

Cost: $500 plus GST. Council rate – $400 plus GST

A workshop for designing rock revetments and groynes for river works

A half-day workshop providing details of best practice methods for designing rock for use in river works. A high-level introduction to geomorphology will be provided for the purpose of understanding how rock works can affect river processes as well as key concepts affecting general scour design. A summary of tools for quantifying hydrological and hydraulic design parameters will be presented followed by guidance on when rock should be considered as a management tool. The design process will then be explained for rock revetments (rock lines) and groynes including general arrangement geometry, sizing, filters, and specifications. Examples will be provided of recent projects including where design/cost/maintenance trade-offs were considered.

Key themes

  • Brief introduction to geomorphology – how rivers work
  • Outline tools for quantifying key design inputs – hydrology, hydraulics
  • When to use rock
  • General arrangement geometry for groynes & revetments
  • Estimating general scour (geomorphic change)
  • Estimating local scour
  • Sizing rock using three different methods
  • Design of granular and geotextile filters
  • Key specifications for rock

Outcomes

A better understanding of designing rocks for use in river works.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

Presenter

Kyle Christensen - River Engineering Consultant

Spaces limited

To register email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Flood Warning Symposium  Building national consistency for flood forecasting and flood warning. 

• Steering group projects

• Cyclone Gabrielle review

• Weather forecasting review

• Nationwide flood forecasting

• Overdesign events

The aim of the workshop is to provide a platform for councils and flood response agencies to continue sharing flood management resources and knowledge. 

Council Workshop for Flood Practitioners

Wednesday, 24 July, 8:30am – 5:00pm

Flood Warning Symposium

Thursday, 25 July, 8:30am – 5:00pm

Council and Partner Agencies. Including CDEM, GNS, MetService, NEMA, NIWA.

Where Te Pae, Christchurch Convention Centre 24 July 2024

Registration closes 30 June 2024 (unless sold out prior). There is no charge to attend.

There is no charge to attend the workshop. 

Catering provided. Optional dinner at own cost. 

If you have any questions please email info.nfwsg@boprc.govt.nz 

 

Gravel Management workshop

A look at gravel management practices and wider considerations around gravel extraction.

A two-day workshop on practical examples of gravel management practices.

Day one will be an introduction to gravel management and cover the fundamentals of fluvial geomorphology for understanding gravel in New Zealand rivers. We will look at a council perspective on changing approaches to assessing gravel volumes to inform extraction.

Day two will cover wider considerations around gravel extraction.

A Global Consents Case Study (Hawkes Bay Regional Council)

Ending on lessons learned open group discussion.

 

Key themes

Day 1

• Introduction to gravel management. Why / How / Where - are we doing it.

• Gravel Mobilisation. The science behind bedload movement and how we influence it.

• Volume calculation methods

• Geomorphic Change Detection

Day 2

A facilitated workshop format where participants will be expected to share their experiences with respect to the wide range of factors to consider when allowing extraction to occur, including but not limited to interaction with;

• Habitat and natural character

• Ground water

• Coastal erosion

• Cultural considerations including mahinga kai

• Existing infrastructure and overlapping consent areas

• Resource management legislation reform

• Consequences of non-extraction

• Site rehabilitation

 

Outcomes

A better understanding of gravel management practices across the country. This is an opportunity for practitioners to connect directly on common complex issues and have a shared space for sharing solutions.

Who would benefit?

Local authority staff involved in the permissions process for river gravel extraction including planners, scientists and engineers. Consultants and contractors actively involved in river gravel management, or who have a specific interest in quarrying and river management.

Presenters

Prof. Jon Tunnicliffe, University of Auckland

Dr. Alastair Clement, Tasman District Council

Dr. Richard Measures, NIWA

Astra McKellow, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council

 

When

Wednesday 28 and Thursday 29 August 2024

 

Where

Wellington City

 

Time

8.30am to 5pm

 

Cost

$1250.00 plus GST.

Council rate – $950.00 plus GST

 

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

 

 

2021 Canterbury Flood Recovery Field Trip

Host: Environment Canterbury.

Overview

A two-day field trip to visit various sites damaged by the May 2021 Canterbury Floods, 3 years on from the event. The focus is to show the practical and fit-for-purpose methods used to repair around 350 damaged sites and is applicable to field staff and river engineers. Sites chosen to visit will include.

  • Large scour bays repaired with a combination of vegetation and engineered structures,
  • Innovative trials of different anchoring methods for anchored tree protection,
  • Inclusion of native planting within scour zones,
  • Heyman fences used in space limited areas,
  • Stop bank repairs including retreat where appropriate,
  • Rock groynes, rock drop structures and rock revetments

You will visit areas where some partial retreat has been possible to make more room for rivers. With repeated floods in the winters of 2022 and 2023, some of the repair methods were shown to not work and different solutions have now been implemented. You will learn the methods used to communicate and manage such a large number of repairs.

Date:

Field trip. Wednesday 25 – Thursday 26 September 2024

Post Field Trip Follow up. Tuesday 15 October 12-1pm

Location: Ashburton, Canterbury

$1300.00 plus GST.

The cost of the field trip is inclusive of accommodation in Ashburton, lunch and dinner on day one and breakfast and lunch on day two. Refreshments will be at a personal expense.

Spaces limited. To register email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Essentials of Engagement

Date: Thursday 3rd October 2024

Location: Christchurch, Epic Innovation

Auckland TBC - If you are interested in this course in Auckland - email rachael.armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz 

Time: 9am-4pm

Breaks times 10.40am (20mins), 12.30pm (30mins), 2.30pm (15mins).

Cost: $500 plus GST. Council rate – $450 plus GST

Presenter: Chris Meme

 

Content

Introduction

The role of the engagement practitioner

Core Values Code of Ethics Contemporary Engagement

  • Engagement definition
  • Community engagement
  • Uses of engagement
  • Benefits of community and stakeholder engagement

Five Essential Elements of Engagement Practice ('Design Platform')

  • Understand context
  • Scope the project
  • Understand people
  • Set purpose of the engagement
  • Shape influence

Quality assurance standards

 

Who should do this course?

Engagement Essentials has been designed for those who will be responsible for:

  • those wishing to obtain the Certificate in Engagement
  • experienced practitioners who are looking for a refresher
  • those considering a career, or career change, in community engagement
  • professionals, such as planners and engineers in related fields.

 

Benefits

  • Validate your knowledge of sector best practice
  • Clarify how the core models should work in practice
  • Ask questions from IAP2’s experienced trainers
  • Form a professional network

 

Engagement Essentials Training | IAP2 Australasia

This course is the pre-requisite for the IAP2 Australasia Certificate in Engagement. Engagement Essentials the perfect starting point for anyone involved in community and stakeholder engagement, at any level or function.

Participants will receive a certificate and gain 7 CPD hours upon completion.

 

A one-day workshop on practical examples of river management practices, and the context in which options are considered. Participants to bring case studies of recent works or current sites where works are proposed.  The workshop will be discussion based, with a short overview of the wider context of river management.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

When

Wednesday 29 January 2025

Where

Wellington

Time

One day (9 am to 5 pm)

Cost

$500.00 plus GST.

Council rate – $400.00 plus GST

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

River management options: relating to river type and reach character.

Site context and pre-flood conditions: of flood history, channel changes and sediment transport activity.

Option selection: from potential bank protection and channel management measures.

Relating works to site: dimensioning structural bank works, scoping channel measures and margin vegetation management.

Learning from mistakes: all river management measures are temporary, thus monitoring and observation skills to learn from the river is essential.

Outcomes

A better understanding of river dynamics and the requirements of river engineering, and of different practices used on different types of rivers and around the country.

Presenter Gary Williams, Water & Soil Engineer, FEngNZ

Key Learning Objectives/Outcomes

Familiarity with key principles in fluvial geomorphology and their application to various river management situations (e.g., catchment (and regional) planning, sediment flux issues, and relation to flood hazards).

When

Monday 10 February - Tuesday 11 February 2025 

Where

Wellington and Waikanae

Time

Two full days (8am-5pm)

Exact times to be confirmed

Cost

$950.00 plus GST for 2-day course. Council rate – $800.00 plus GST

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

Management issues for which geomorphic insight is fundamental:

  • Work with the river (nature-based solutions) – respect diversity, work with process
  • Determine what is realistically achievable
  • Be proactive, precautionary, pre-emptive – tackle threatening processes
  • Risk management
  • Integrated Catchment Management
  • Active and passive practices (including the do-nothing option) – hard versus soft engineering practices … Role of maintenance (weed management)
  • Flood management/protection versus ‘living with a living river’
  • Managing river erosion
  • Using sediment budgets to manage sedimentation issues (including sand/gravel extraction)

Spatial Dimensions of geomorphologically-informed river management

Catchment

  • Fundamental geomorphic unit
  • Longitudinal profile – source, transfer accumulation zones
  • Network relationships (tributary-trunk stream pattern, flux)
  • Connectivity relationships

Channel planform: Braided, wandering gravel-bed, active meandering passive meandering, discontinuous watercourse (wetland/swamp)

Channel geometry

  • Downstream and at-a-station hydraulic geometry
  • Size and shape

Geomorphic units

  • Erosional and depositional forms (and process relations)
  • Channel (instream) and floodplain
  • Assemblages – and approach to analysis of morphodynamics, condition, recovery (Fryirs & Brierley, 2021)

Bed material size

  • Bedrock, Boulder/cobble, gravel-bed, sand-bed, fine-grained
  • Bedload, mixed load, suspended load

Temporal dimensions of geomorphologically-informed river management

Timescale: Geologic, geomorphic, engineering

Magnitude-frequency relations

Equilibrium versus non-linear relations

Legacy effect (landscape memory)

Processes of geomorphic river adjustment

  • Balance of impelling and resisting forces
  • Stream power, shear stress
  • Resistance elements – role of riparian vegetation, wood, ecosystem engineers
  • Entrainment, transport, deposition (Hjulstrom curve)
  • Sediment transport – Bedload, suspended load, solution load
  • Aggradation/degradation regime – Lane Balance

Evolutionary trajectory of rivers (and recovery potential)

  • Relating character and behaviour (capacity for adjustment/range of variability) to evolutionary trajectory
  • Scoping (modelling) prospective river futures to determine what is realistically achievable in management

Geomorphology and river health (condition)

What do we measure where, how and why?

What do we measure against?

Geomorphic relations to Māori conceptualisations of rivers

A living river ethos, mauri, mana, ora

How geomorphology can support river management (indicative only – set up follow up specialist courses)

Scoping river futures - Proactive and precautionary approaches to Visioning & Catchment Planning

Concern for treatment response

Geoethical considerations – concerns for social and environmental justice

  • Risk management
  • Integrated Catchment Management
  • Active and passive practices (including the do-nothing option) – hard versus soft engineering practices … Role of maintenance (weed management)
  • Flood management/protection versus ‘living with a living river’
  • Managing river erosion
  • Using sediment budgets to manage sedimentation issues (including sand/gravel extraction)

Presenters: Ian Fuller, Gary Brierley, Jon Tunnicliffe

Upcoming Webinars

All webinars are one hour.

From the industrial revolution to the ‘green’ energy transition: impacts of metal mining on global river systems.

Mining for metals produces waste containing toxic elements such as lead, mercury, and arsenic. Macklin et al. compiled global data on the locations of active and inactive metal mines and tailings dams, which hold mine waste. Using process-based , they assessed river system contamination from mines and failed tailings dams and determined the floodplains, people, and livestock that could be affected. Over 23 million people live on the ~164,000 km2 of floodplains affected by mining. Although tailings dam failures have massive local impacts, they are estimated to affect far fewer people than baseline contamination from current or past mining activities. Increased global data and monitoring are needed to fully understand the ecological and health impacts of this extractive industry suggesting a need for new safeguards to address the spike in demand for ‘green’ minerals”.

Presenter: Mark Macklin is Distinguished Professor of River Systems and Global Change and Founding Director of the Lincoln Centre for Water and Planetary Health, University of Lincoln, UK. He is also co-director of Water and Planetary Health Analytics (waterandplanetaryhealth.com) that provides specialist leadership and expertise in planetary health approaches to water, biodiversity, climate change and industrial development worldwide for the green transition. Mark has acted as a consultant to Lloyd’s of London, Office of Nuclear Regulation, Rio Tinto, Auriel, Imperial Metals, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, and the World Wildlife Fund. He is a multi-award-winning physical geographer, including the 2018 Murchison award from the Royal Geographical Society and holds adjunct professorships at Massey University, New Zealand, the Centre for the Inland, La Trobe University, Australia, and Fiji National University. Mark is an authority on long-term human-river environment interactions, flood-risk assessment, metal mining pollution and its impact on ecosystems and society. He has published over 400 peer-reviewed articles (Google Scholar: h-index 81 – 19,286 citations) with external grant capture > £30 million, including 19 RCUK (18 NERC, 1 ESPRC), 5 EU, 3 ARC and 3 Leverhulme research grants. He conducts his research worldwide with ongoing projects in Australia, Kazakhstan, New Zealand, Romania, Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Zambia, and the UK.

https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.adg6704?casa_token=w-HrLEUpLuoAAAAA%3AXj6IUeAkKX1xA2rlJohl40X2UMJJi_eptLSj-WY-j3e-R80H3KNB--FVEbrdjdA-9KDWnAIIZuv_H7pO

To register https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_oARz4DiHRQiSPAodoKOsVQ

Working with geomorphic river recovery in river management: How, where and at what cost?

There are calls for river management globally, to fully transition from command-and-control engineering to nature-based approaches (aka process-based, ecosystem-based, recovery-enhancement). However, even in this era of nature-based solutions, ad hoc and reactive management still dominates and the health of river systems continues to decline.

Working with recovery and (re)building corridors of river recovery is a nature-based approach to river management. However, to work with river recovery in-practice requires that practitioners are able to monitor and track changes in river condition to identify when recovery is occurring so that decision-support frameworks can determine whether river management is required, where, when and how much to intervene to enhance river recovery and when to opt-out of management because the system requires little (or no) intervention.

In this presentation Kirstie will focus on the structural aspects of river recovery (i.e. geomorphic river recovery). Kirstie will outline an approach to identify and measure key geomorphic indicators of river recovery for different river types. Kirstie will then discuss the types of information and understanding (databases) that are needed to undertake assessments of recovery potential across catchments. Kirstie will also present findings from cost-benefit analysis that shows that working with recovery and adopting a corridors approach to river management provides the best return on investment. To do this Kirstie will use the case study of eastern New South Wales (NSW) Australia as a demonstration of the benefits of working with river recovery in river management. Kirstie will also present generic principles that can be applied in any setting, including New Zealand.

Presenter: Professor Kirstie Fryirs, Macquarie University

Kirstie’s research focusses on how rivers work, how they have evolved, how they have been impacted by anthropogenic disturbance, and how to best use geomorphology in river management. Kirstie also researches how rivers and catchments may respond to future disturbances, particularly floods and droughts. Kirstie is probably best known as the co-developer of the River Styles Framework and professional short courses, and more recently delivery of microcredential courses for industry. Kirstie works in multi-disciplinary, collaborative teams that include ecologists, hydrologists, social scientists, industry practitioners and citizens. Kirstie has co-written three books and published over 150 journal papers. Kirstie is on the Specialist Environmental Advisory Committee (SEAC) for the Certified Environmental Practitioner (geomorphology) program. Kirstie is passionate about rivers, their health, their geodiversity and how to use best available science in conservation and rehabilitation practice.

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_K28wco29TG6lOMRaK8Ar6g

Natural Flood Management (NFM): Using all the geomorphological tools in the toolbox to achieve nature-based flood mitigation.

The 2021-2022 floods across eastern Australia highlighted the vulnerability of rivers to changing climate extremes. They are the costliest natural disaster in Australia’s recorded history with insured losses of ~$6.41 billion, well ahead of the 2019-20 ‘black summer’ bushfires (ICA 2022). By 2050, Australia’s annual extreme weather cost is likely to be $32.5 billion (ICA, 2022).

The 2022 New South Wales (NSW) Government inquiry into the floods calls for implementation of “nature-based flood mitigation … using floodplains as assets … and letting watercourses largely flow naturally rather than implementing engineering barriers such as flood levees and mitigation schemes to stop floods” (O’Kane and Fuller, 2022). In this context we must urgently re-examine how to live with rivers and build nature-based flood mitigation capacity and resilience into them, to prepare for an inevitable future where floods are forecast to be more intense and extreme. So, how do we achieve this?

Natural Flood Management (NFM) uses natural processes to slow floods down, reduce their erosive power, and reduce flood risk. In this presentation Kirstie will describe how an understanding of geomorphic, vegetative and hydrological recovery can be used to determine the NFM potential of rivers and catchments. Kirstie will then consider how we realise NFM on-the-ground by using and applying all the nature-based tools we have in the toolbox to enhance river recovery and deliver flood mitigation to communities. Kirstie will use the 2021-2022 catastrophic floods in Eastern NSW as a case study to demonstrate the potential for delivering geomorphologically-informed NFM and river recovery in 21st Century river management (Fryirs et al., 2023).

Presenter: Professor Kirstie Fryirs, Macquarie University

Kirstie’s research focusses on how rivers work, how they have evolved, how they have been impacted by anthropogenic disturbance, and how to best use geomorphology in river management. Kirstie also researches how rivers and catchments may respond to future disturbances, particularly floods and droughts. Kirstie is probably best known as the co-developer of the River Styles Framework and professional short courses, and more recently delivery of microcredential courses for industry. Kirstie works in multi-disciplinary, collaborative teams that include ecologists, hydrologists, social scientists, industry practitioners and citizens. Kirstie has co-written three books and published over 150 journal papers. Kirstie is on the Specialist Environmental Advisory Committee (SEAC) for the Certified Environmental Practitioner (geomorphology) program. Kirstie is passionate about rivers, their health, their geodiversity and how to use best available science in conservation and rehabilitation practice.

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_nw8EcV_LR5W3Nkp9cIFjTw

Fryirs, K., Zhang, N., Ralph, T., Arash, A.M. 2023. Natural flood management: Lessons and opportunities from the catastrophic 2021-2022 floods in eastern Australia. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. 48, 1649-1664. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.5647

ICA (Insurance Council of Australia) 2022. Catastrophe Resilience Report. Available at: https://insurancecouncil.com.au/ 

O’Kane, M., Fuller, M. 2022. 2022 Flood Inquiry Volume One: Summary Report. 29th July 2022. New South Wales Government, Sydney. Available at: https://www.nsw.gov.au/nsw-government/projects-and-initiatives/floodinquiry 

Asset Management Training 

Join Johan Kirsten (HBRC) for an Introduction & Overview in Asset Management

Key Topics

  • ISO 55000, 1 & 2
  • The International Infrastructure Management Manual
  • 3 x Core AM Levels
  • A Fundamental Principle of AM
  • The Asset Management Landscape
  • Asset Lifecycle Thinking
  • The AM Journey
  • Accurate Asset Information
  • Information Velocity
  • Focused and Continuous Improvement
  • AM in the Flood Protection and Drainage Context

To regsiter email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Webinar Recordings

Check out our webinar library to watch previously recorded webinars.

Webinar library