© 2022 Resilient River Communities

Resilient River Communities

River Managers' Professional Development Programme

This programme has been designed to identify a framework to raise awareness, learning and development pathways and ultimately drive recruitment and attraction strategies to assure river management expertise for the future

Upcoming Workshops

Successful completion of a workshop will result in participants being awarded a Attendance Certificate stating CPD hours. 

A two-day field trip around Hawke's Bay, exploring the repair work from damage caused by Cyclone Gabrielle on the 14 March 2023.

Locations to include Waipawa: Walker Road, Papanui River and SH50.  Heretaunga Plains: Waiohiki, Dartmoor, Springfeild, Awatoto and Eskdale

Group will be split into two groups travelling on bus to different locations.

Key Learning Outcomes:

  • Resilience in building
  • Being prepared for a larger event than the assets are designed for.
  • How to be adaptable.
  • How to structure rebuilds
  • Specifications around level of service
  • The importance of modelling and planning

Stopbank breach repairs update with Jon Kingsford - June 2023 - YouTube

When

Thursday 14 March - Friday 15 March 2024

Where

Hawke's Bay 

Time

9:00 am to 4:30 pm TBC 

Networking dinner on evening 14 March 2024

Cost

$750.00 plus GST.

Council rate – $550.00 plus GST

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

 

Recently asked questions

What sort of repairs will this be looking at?

A lot will be repaired – but it will include damage to stopbanks, pumpstations, slumping on drains and extensive erosion on riverbanks.

I have an interest on bridge and other structures asset management and is doing some works related to that now, so I was wondering if these are relevant from a structure asset management point of view?

It may be of interest, though structural elements won’t be a focus of the field trip. We may touch on the effects of bridge design on resilience during large flood events – i.e., height above bed, number of piers, pier, and abutment design etc. The field trip will show a wide range of the effects of flooding and our response to these, though the technical aspects will mostly cover civil and geotechnical elements. 

 

Council Monthly Catch ups:

Let's connect, share an idea, talk about issues and work on solutions as a team. 

Followed by networking. 

There is clear evidence that upfront investment in risk management can save millions. All councils have at some point dealt with an extreme weather event first hand. As these events become more common, adaptation to protect lives and livelihoods is becoming more important. Adaptation involves a multi-tool response that considers not only infrastructure, but also ensuring development does not occur in high risk areas, working through how to reduce the consequences of flood and where appropriate looking at retreat. Internationally, this multi-tool approach is recognised as the PARA approach (Protect, Accommodate, Retreat, and Avoid), and is endorsed locally by the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), the Department of Internal Affairs, and the Ministry for the Environment in improving our flood resilience from pluvial and fluvial flooding. The PARA Framework was a key component of our Before the Deluge Business case.

This session will discuss the PARA approach and look at case studies of how three different councils are integrating this into how they work. This is a journey we are all on and participants will get the opportunity to ask questions and share their experiences, challenges and learnings working with this approach.

The workshop will be led by Graeme Campbell (GWRC), Leigh Griffiths (ECAN) and Julie Beaufill (Waikato).

*COUNCIL ONLY WORKSHOP* - Book out a conference room and get your team together.

*LIMITED SPACES*

A half-day workshop providing explanation and examples of the concepts described in the recently released NZ River Managers SIG – Room for the River guidelines.   The technical basis for the Room for the River concept will be explained along with examples of the methodology that can be used to determine river management lines and agreed intervention protocols to facilitate effective implementation. 

Where

Wellington

When

Friday 19 April 2024

Time

10:00am-3:00pm

Cost

$500 + GST

$400 + GST (council staff rate)

How to register

To register email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

  • What is Room for the River
  • How can it be used to manage flood and erosion risks within the context of climate change and Te mana o te wai
  • How to determine river management design lines
  • Interventions and dealing with critical assets within the river management design lines
  • Implementation enablers including planning controls

Outcomes

A better understanding of how to derive river management design lines and how they can be implemented to achieve Room for the River outcomes.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

Presenter

Kyle Christensen - River Engineering Consultant

Rock Design for River Works

Date: 10 May 2024

Location: Wellington,

Time: 10am-3pm

Cost: $500 plus GST. Council rate – $400 plus GST

 

A workshop for designing rock revetments and groynes for River Works

A half-day workshop providing details of best practice methods for designing rock for use in river works. A high-level introduction to geomorphology will be provided for the purpose of understanding how rock works can affect river processes as well as key concepts affecting general scour design. A summary of tools for quantifying hydrological and hydraulic design parameters will be presented followed by guidance on when rock should be considered as a management tool. The design process will then be explained for rock revetments (rock lines) and groynes including general arrangement geometry, sizing, filters, and specifications. Examples will be provided of recent projects including where design/cost/maintenance trade-offs were considered.

Key themes

  • Brief introduction to geomorphology – how rivers work.
  • Outline tools for quantifying key design inputs – hydrology, hydraulics.
  • When to use rock.
  • General arrangement geometry for groynes & revetments.
  • Estimating general scour (geomorphic change);
  • Estimating local scour.
  • Sizing rock using three different methods.
  • Design of granular and geotextile filters.
  • Key specifications for rock.

Outcomes

A better understanding of designing rock for use in river works.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

Presenter

Kyle Christensen - River Engineering Consultant

Spaces limited

To register email Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

 

A one-day workshop on practical examples of river management practices, and the context in which options are considered. Participants to bring case studies of recent works or current sites where works are proposed.  The workshop will be discussion based, with a short overview of the wider context of river management.

Who would benefit?

Local authority engineers and asset managers, consultants and contractors actively involved in river management, or who have a specific interest in and experience of rivers and their management.

When

Wednesday 29 January 2025

Where

Wellington

Time

One day (9 am to 5 pm)

Cost

$500.00 plus GST.

Council rate – $400.00 plus GST

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

River management options: relating to river type and reach character.

Site context and pre-flood conditions: of flood history, channel changes and sediment transport activity.

Option selection: from potential bank protection and channel management measures.

Relating works to site: dimensioning structural bank works, scoping channel measures and margin vegetation management.

Learning from mistakes: all river management measures are temporary, thus monitoring and observation skills to learn from the river is essential.

Outcomes

A better understanding of river dynamics and the requirements of river engineering, and of different practices used on different types of rivers and around the country.

Presenter Gary Williams, Water & Soil Engineer, FEngNZ

Key Learning Objectives/Outcomes

Familiarity with key principles in fluvial geomorphology and their application to various river management situations (e.g., catchment (and regional) planning, sediment flux issues, and relation to flood hazards).

When

Monday 10 February - Tuesday 11 February 2025 

Where

Wellington and Waikanae

Time

Two full days (8am-5pm)

Exact times to be confirmed

Cost

$950.00 plus GST for 2-day course. Council rate – $800.00 plus GST

Where to register

Email Rachael Armstrong - Rachael.Armstrong@hbrc.govt.nz

Key themes

Management issues for which geomorphic insight is fundamental:

  • Work with the river (nature-based solutions) – respect diversity, work with process
  • Determine what is realistically achievable
  • Be proactive, precautionary, pre-emptive – tackle threatening processes
  • Risk management
  • Integrated Catchment Management
  • Active and passive practices (including the do-nothing option) – hard versus soft engineering practices … Role of maintenance (weed management)
  • Flood management/protection versus ‘living with a living river’
  • Managing river erosion
  • Using sediment budgets to manage sedimentation issues (including sand/gravel extraction)

Spatial Dimensions of geomorphologically-informed river management

Catchment

  • Fundamental geomorphic unit
  • Longitudinal profile – source, transfer accumulation zones
  • Network relationships (tributary-trunk stream pattern, flux)
  • Connectivity relationships

Channel planform: Braided, wandering gravel-bed, active meandering passive meandering, discontinuous watercourse (wetland/swamp)

Channel geometry

  • Downstream and at-a-station hydraulic geometry
  • Size and shape

Geomorphic units

  • Erosional and depositional forms (and process relations)
  • Channel (instream) and floodplain
  • Assemblages – and approach to analysis of morphodynamics, condition, recovery (Fryirs & Brierley, 2021)

Bed material size

  • Bedrock, Boulder/cobble, gravel-bed, sand-bed, fine-grained
  • Bedload, mixed load, suspended load

Temporal dimensions of geomorphologically-informed river management

Timescale: Geologic, geomorphic, engineering

Magnitude-frequency relations

Equilibrium versus non-linear relations

Legacy effect (landscape memory)

Processes of geomorphic river adjustment

  • Balance of impelling and resisting forces
  • Stream power, shear stress
  • Resistance elements – role of riparian vegetation, wood, ecosystem engineers
  • Entrainment, transport, deposition (Hjulstrom curve)
  • Sediment transport – Bedload, suspended load, solution load
  • Aggradation/degradation regime – Lane Balance

Evolutionary trajectory of rivers (and recovery potential)

  • Relating character and behaviour (capacity for adjustment/range of variability) to evolutionary trajectory
  • Scoping (modelling) prospective river futures to determine what is realistically achievable in management

Geomorphology and river health (condition)

What do we measure where, how and why?

What do we measure against?

Geomorphic relations to Māori conceptualisations of rivers

A living river ethos, mauri, mana, ora

How geomorphology can support river management (indicative only – set up follow up specialist courses)

Scoping river futures - Proactive and precautionary approaches to Visioning & Catchment Planning

Concern for treatment response

Geoethical considerations – concerns for social and environmental justice

  • Risk management
  • Integrated Catchment Management
  • Active and passive practices (including the do-nothing option) – hard versus soft engineering practices … Role of maintenance (weed management)
  • Flood management/protection versus ‘living with a living river’
  • Managing river erosion
  • Using sediment budgets to manage sedimentation issues (including sand/gravel extraction)

Presenters: Ian Fuller, Gary Brierley, Jon Tunnicliffe

Upcoming Webinars

All webinars are one hour.

Climate Change  “Room for the River"

The seminar aims to provide an overview of the assumptions, methods, limitations and regional scale finding results associated with the Deep South’s Climate Change impacts project. This project coupled the IPCC 5th climate projection ensemble for New Zealand (Ministry for environment 2018) with an a-priori parametrised hydrological model across New Zealand.

As part of the seminar, Christian will use case studies to illustrate some of the challenges associated with the use and interpretation of those datasets to inform water resource and hydrological extreme investigations. The learnings from this project are used to inform method development associated with the use of the IPCC6th climate projections for New Zealand to be released in June 2024.

In terms of accompanying resources: NIWA developed a data infosheet to accompany Christian’s work is available here, and this may be useful for participants to read before the first webinar. There is also a high level info sheet around water data and research, here which includes these projects, as well as other areas of water data for NZ.

Presenter - Christian Zammit: Christian has been at NIWA since 2010. He is a hydrologist whose specialises in development of understanding of catchment scale hydrological processes and its implementation in hydrological models in gauged and ungauged catchments across spatial scales. Over the past 12 years, he has further specialised in the use of hydrological models at local-regional and national scale associated to understand and quantify how climate change may impact water resource decision making, and riverine weather-related hazards including extremes at local, regional and national scale.

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HuAeFE3-TyqIrqFIFIywQg 

Mā te Haumaru ō te Wai: Flood Resilience Aotearoa is a 5-year MBIE funded Endeavour programme to understand Aotearoa’s flood inundation hazard and risk under the current and future climate. We are developing an understanding of social vulnerability, especially in the case of repeated flooding events and working with iwi, central, regional and local government and other stakeholders to develop tools and practices to make Aotearoa more resilient to our most frequent natural hazard. Emily will give an overview of the programme and then present a case study for Westport.

Presenter Emily Lane: Dr Emily Lane is a hydrodynamic scientist with a specific focus on natural hazards. She is actively researching tsunami, storm surge and flooding inundation. She is leading Mā te haumaru ō te wai - an Endeavour programme focussed on understanding Aotearoa's flood inundation hazard and risk at a national level and using this to improve our resilience to flooding. Her background is applied mathematics and she has a PhD in applied mathematics with a geoscience minor from the University of Arizona. She has been working at NIWA since 2006.

There is a high level info sheet around water data and research, here which includes these projects, as well as other areas of water data for NZ.

To register: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-H23rPrtRNCzVERF5nRmzw

Lynette will discuss her research teams’ study on encouraging key beneficial behaviours (reporting stormwater pollution, installing urban rainwater tanks, volunteering) for urban freshwater biodiversity.

Residents’ behaviour is fundamental to protecting and restoring freshwater biodiversity in urban areas. However, a key challenge facing government agencies, environmental organisations, and community groups is convincing people to engage in activities that will benefit urban freshwater biodiversity. Lynette will describe a systematic approach to designing effective human behaviour change interventions, illustrated with a practical example for improving volunteer involvement with urban freshwater restoration projects.

The research team conducted a set of nationwide online surveys and established volunteering for urban freshwater restoration as a key target behaviour. They developed a randomised control trial with a restoration group in Kirikiriroa | Hamilton and tested ways to increase first-time volunteer participation and investigated volunteering benefits. Participants were recruited through social media and 627 potential first-time volunteers were identified. In the first stage of their experiment, they found that a $50 voucher combined with a nudge was most effective at increasing volunteer rates at an actual event. In the second stage, they found that volunteering for the first time increases future volunteering behaviour, generates positive spillovers to other pro-environmental behaviours and strengthens environmental attitudes and self-identity.

This research was partly undertaken in collaboration with Robbie Maris (University College London), Zack Dorner (Lincoln University) and Fredrik Carlsson (University of Gotherburg).

Lynette McLeod is an environmental psychologist whose work is focused on improving human behaviour change to achieve better outcomes for people and the environment. Her interdisciplinary approach to research is guided by thirty years of experience across both science and social science fields, holding professional research positions within NSW Department of Primary Industries and the New England University and working with the community to manage a range of issues, including free-roaming cats, wild dogs, spray drift and human waste management in alpine areas. In 2021, she started McLeod Research, a consulting company helping organisations better understand their target audiences and design improved behaviour change interventions. Her current clients include RSPCA NSW, Maanaka Whenua Landcare Research and New Zealand Alpine Club. Lynette also holds an adjunct Senior Fellow at the University of Canterbury and is part of the Aotearoa New Zealand BioHeritage Science Challenge team empowering environmental stewardship and Kaitiakitanga.

About the BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho

The BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho aims to aims to protect and manage Aotearoa New Zealand’s biodiversity, improve our biosecurity and enhance our resilience to harmful organisms by creating real, on-the-ground impact in the areas of Whakamana/Empower, Tiaki/Protect and Whakahou/Restore.

We are doing this through national partnership, delivering a step-change in research innovation, globally leading technologies, and community and sector action.

What are the National Science Challenges?

Eleven National Science Challenges were created in 2014 to answer some of Aotearoa New Zealand’s biggest science questions. The Challenges bring together the country’s top scientists to work collaboratively across disciplines, institutions and borders to achieve their objectives.

In total they were given just over $680 million by the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). This was to fund research from 2014 – 2024, with a review period at the end of ‘Tranche 1’ (2014 – 2019).

New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge was allocated $63.7 million of this to facilitate research and impact in the areas of biosecurity and native biodiversity. We are hosted by the Crown Research Institute Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, with our offices in Lincoln, just south of Christchurch.

Leading our mahi (work) are Co-Directors Daniel Patrick and Melanie Mark-Shadbolt, as well as a dedicated Leadership Group.

You can keep up-to-date by checking out our research programmes or following us on social media.

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ydFPfWkTQ9e-W0678a1U8A 

Aotearoa New Zealand’s BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho ‘Empowering Environmental Stewardship and Kaitiakitanga’ team presents:Te-ia-o-te-Rangi: Exploring localised Tūhoe astronomical knowledge in relation to the localised environmental management of water.

Speaker: Nathan Matamua

Nathan will be presenting qualitative research that aims to shed light on how a local Māori community can be better empowered to enact kaitiakitanga. Sharing kōrero with two Tūhoe tohunga (experts) from the local Tūhoe community of Ruatāhuna, the research draws on their experiences and meaning making when considering their understandings of the relationship between localised Tūhoe star lore and localised environmental knowledge associated with water.

Through analysis of collected data, the research provides a discussion on a lived Tūhoe perspective in relation to understanding water quality, and how these understandings may better empower local communities to enact local forms of kaitiakitanga.

Nathan Matamua (Ngāi Tuhoe) is a member of the BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho ‘Empowering environmental stewardship and Kaitiakitanga' team.

Nathan was born and raised in Levin, a town to the south of Palmerston North. “My tribal home is in the Bay of Plenty,” says Nathan. “I’m Tūhoe, and I’ve always been made aware of that. But even though we’ve constantly travelled home, in many ways, I still see myself as an outsider.”

Nathan has recently completed a Master’s in Psychology at Massey University and has found this a way of reconnecting with his roots and with his whānau. “Prior to being a student, I was a supply chain manager for a global company,” says Nathan. “I had the good career, but I wanted to spend a bit more time focused on family.”

Studying was a way of doing that, and Nathan has found that it has naturally progressed to reconnecting with his identity.

Read more about Nathan Matamua here.

About the BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho

The BioHeritage Challenge/Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho aims to aims to protect and manage Aotearoa New Zealand’s biodiversity, improve our biosecurity and enhance our resilience to harmful organisms by creating real, on-the-ground impact in the areas of Whakamana/Empower, Tiaki/Protect and Whakahou/Restore.

We are doing this through national partnership, delivering a step-change in research innovation, globally leading technologies, and community and sector action.

What are the National Science Challenges?

Eleven National Science Challenges were created in 2014 to answer some of Aotearoa New Zealand’s biggest science questions. The Challenges bring together the country’s top scientists to work collaboratively across disciplines, institutions and borders to achieve their objectives.

In total they were given just over $680 million by the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). This was to fund research from 2014 – 2024, with a review period at the end of ‘Tranche 1’ (2014 – 2019).

New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge was allocated $63.7 million of this to facilitate research and impact in the areas of biosecurity and native biodiversity. We are hosted by the Crown Research Institute Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, with our offices in Lincoln, just south of Christchurch.

Leading our mahi (work) are Co-Directors Daniel Patrick and Melanie Mark-Shadbolt, as well as a dedicated Leadership Group.

You can keep up to date by checking out our research programmes or following us on social media.

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_am2CQgs0SgGilWPo56DqWw

Webinar Recordings

Cultural and Environmental Values

Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi): meanings, principles, and importance for contemporary river management in Aotearoa New Zealand Sep 2022

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

The NPS-FM and Te Mana o te Wai (Te Ao Māori & River Ecosystem Management) Sep 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Navigating towards Te mana o te Wai Sep 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Mana Whenua Statements (cultural impact assessment) Sep 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Legal Obligations River Legislation Series Values  

River Legislation Series |  1 Nov 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
River Legislation Series |  2 Nov 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
River Legislation Series |  3 Nov 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
River Legislation Series | 4 Dec 2022 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

River Ecology Series

Introduction to River Ecology May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Impact of river management on river bird habitat May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Tools that Regional Councils use to measure ecological health May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Impacts of River Engineering on Ecological Health May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Mitigation of River Engineering on River Ecology May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Estuarine Ecology May 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Communication and Engagement Series

Māori Engagement, Hiwa Jun 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Community and Landowner engagement in freshwater planning Jun 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Collective action for improved freshwater health Oct 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
The subtle art of managing a project: making it fit-for-purpose in the public sector Oct 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Looking ahead to 2024 Nov 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Climate Change Adaptation

Reconstructing flood histories Jul 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Societal vulnerability to cascading events Jul 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Climate change - 'room for the river' Jul 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Economics of Climate Management Jul 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Deploying artificial intelligence for climate change adaptation Aug 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Climate Risk Management - framing the problem, measures, tools, and processes in an uncertain future Sep 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Adaptation Benefits and Effectiveness: where we are at Sep 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
The Adaptation Agenda - room for the river Nov 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Climate Change Adaptation - Practical Approaches Nov 2023 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING
Future Management of the Waiho River Jan  2024 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Best Practice Series

Application of Room for the River to NZ Rivers and Streams Feb 2024 CLICK HERE TO VIEW RECORDING
Stopbank Design and Construction Guidelines Feb 2024 CLICK HERE TO VIEW RECORDING

Digital Badges Online Courses

Recommended Courses

AM 101 –Introduction to Asset Management

CC 101 –Introduction to Climate Adaptation in Asset Management 

WM 104 –Introduction to Flood Risk Asset Management

WM 240 –Inspection and Performance

WM241 Risk Management and Planning